Health-Points: Friday 2.27.09

  • I guess squirrels don’t get peanut allergies. But kids don’t have to get them either! A new study in the journal Allergy claims kids fed increasing amounts of peanut flour over a period of six weeks actually built up higher thresholds to peanuts over time; via FoodNavigator.

 

Continue Reading...

Salt Worse for People with Metabolic Syndrome

According to a new study in The Lancet salt may be more harmful for patients with metabolic syndrome, a major predicator of heart disease and type-2 diabetes, increasing risk of high blood pressure. Researchers examined over 1,900 Chinese people, ages 16 and up, they were fed either a high or low-sodium diet for 7 days and their blood pressure was checked regularly. Results showed participants with metabolic syndrome were more likely to be sensitive salt and had higher blood pressure; HealthDay News reports.

Salt gets a bad rap. But it’s warranted. A recent report found reducing salt helps lower systolic blood pressure by helping blood vessels relax. And in September, experts at American Heart Association claimed cutting salt helps control high blood pressure. Salt also contributes to heart disease and stroke.

As for metabolic syndrome, previous studies show red meat increases the risk of metabolic syndrome but eating some mixed nuts everyday lowers risk by 13.7%. Nutty!

Continue Reading...

Zinc Cuts Diabetes Risk in Women

Ladies eat your zinc! Because new findings in the journal Diabetes Care claim increased intake of zinc may lower diabetes risk in women. Researchers studied 82,297 women and during the course of 24 years more than 6,000 cases of type-2 diabetes were documented and data obtained from a food questionnaire showed women with the highest average dietary intake of zinc cut diabetes risk by 10% and 8% for those with highest average total intake of zinc; NutraIngredients reports.

Peas are a good source of zinc. So are sesame seeds, with lots of zinc, calcium, magnesium, copper, manganese and fiber. Asparagus is good too. Asparagus is packed with zinc as well as selenium and folate. And other green veggies, like broccoli, kale and lettuce are also awesome sources of zinc.

Zinc is important for guys too. Previous studies show low levels of zinc contribute to cancer, cardiovascular and all-cause mortality risk in middle-aged men. Eek!

Continue Reading...

Omega-3's Help Fight the Complications of Obesity

New findings in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology reveal eating omega-3 fatty acids may protect the liver from damage caused by obesity, specifically insulin resistance. The experiment, which used mice with altered genes to make them obese and diabetic, discovered those mice feed a diet rich in omega-3’s had less hepatic inflammation and improved insulin tolerance. Researchers hope these findings will help doctors and nutritionists develop better weight-loss diets for obese patients; ScienceDaily investigates.

Now, sources of omega-3’s include flaxseed, 1.7 grams per tablespoon; flax oil, 2.2 grams per teaspoon; walnuts, 2 grams per serving of 12 walnut halves; soybeans, 2 grams per 1 1/2 cups; and tofu, 2 grams per 1 1/2 cups. And according to Dr. Fuhrman, nuts and seeds are perfectly adapted for human consumption.

Other studies have shown omega-3 fatty acids boost brain power and eye health and reduce the risk of type-1 diabetes and lower the likelihood of having another stroke.

Continue Reading...

Surprise! Weight-Loss Helps Diabetics...

Reported in The Journal of the American Medical Association researchers reveal weight-loss and lifestyle changes are more effective than insulin therapy for overweight individuals with insulin-resistant type-2 diabetes. High insulin levels overload tissues with fatty molecules, leading to insulin-resistance. And treating people with MORE insulin does not overpower the resistance, but can cause organ damage. Losing weight and improving diet is much safer; Medical News Today explains.

An estimated 24 million Americans now have diabetes. And drugs are not answer. According to Dr. Fuhrman, a diet rich in healthy foods, such as green vegetables, beans, tomatoes, mushrooms, onions, garlic, raw nuts, seeds and some fruit, in combination with weight-loss and exercise can help you kick insulin and reverse diabetes.

America needs to take the hint! More and more of us have chronic conditions, like heart disease, cancer and diabetes, than ever before. And all this extra fat isn’t helping.

Continue Reading...

Vitamin D Makes Girls Big and Mean!

A new study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism claims vitamin D levels in adolescent girls are significantly associated with muscle power and force. Researchers recruited 99 inner-city girls from a multi-ethnic school between the ages of 12 and 14. And blood testing revealed 75% of the girls had low levels of vitamin D and the girls with higher levels performed much better on a jumping test used to measure strength; Nutraingredients reports.

Ironically, in October the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended doubling children’s daily intake of vitamin D to 400 units, replacing its 2003 recommendation of 200 units, based on claims that sufficient vitamin D may help reduce risk of cancer, heart disease and diabetes.

And previous reports show vitamin D deficiencies can cause back pain in older women and even increase the likelihood of c-sections.

Continue Reading...

High Fructose Corn Syrup Oozing Mercury...

A new study in Environmental Health discovered mercury in citric acid, sodium benzoate and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). An analysis of HFCS from three different manufacturers revealed mercury levels ranging from under the detection limit of 0.005 to 0.570 micrograms of mercury per gram of high fructose corn syrup. The researchers claim average daily consumption of HFCS in America is 50 grams per person, spelling possible danger for children and sensitive populations; Reuters investigates.

But back in October, the lunatics at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ruled that high fructose corn syrup is natural, prompting an ad campaign by corn refiners insisting that HFCS is the same as sugar. Yeah, because that’s something to brag about!

Sorry sugar pushers. Previous reports have linked high fructose corn syrup with diabetes and obesity and soft drinks with cardiovascular disease.

Continue Reading...