Vitamin D Lowers Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

Vitamin D supplements may reduce the risk of multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune condition causing the immune system to attack the central nervous system. Disease onset occurs in young adults and affects 350,000 people in the United States, but new findings in the journal PLoS Genetics reveal giving infants vitamin D may “switch on” certain genes and lower overall risk of multiple sclerosis; NutraIngredients reports.

Our bodies convert ultraviolet rays from the sun into vitamin D and vitamin D increases the absorption of calcium, leading to stronger bones and less risk of osteoporosis. And getting sufficient vitamin D has been linked to lower risk of prostate cancer and hypertension.

Actually in 2006, Harvard researchers also determined higher levels of vitamin D may protect against multiple sclerosis.

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Osteoporosis Protection for Life!

You might not realize it, but osteoporosis is an epidemic, effecting 8 million American women and 2 million men, yes men can get it too, and causes 1.5 million bone fractures each year. Now, in his brand new DVD, Osteoporosis Protection for Life, Dr. Fuhrman discusses the causes of osteoporosis, offers prevention strategies, like nutrition and exercise, and dispels a lot of the misinformation about osteoporosis.

Like how drugs aren’t the answer. In January, a study came out linking the popular osteoporosis drug Fosamax with esophageal cancer. From October 2005 to May 2008, the FDA received 23 claims of patients being diagnosed with esophagus cancer and Fosamax is the suspect drug in 21 cases and the concomitant drug in 2. And previously, Fosamax and its generic alendronate were found to be associated with irregular heartbeat. Eek!

Then later in January, we learned not all exercise is created equal. Cyclists, despite being thin and fit, actually have more osteoporosis. That’s why researchers suggested bike-riders add running and weight-training to their workouts. Strong muscles mean strong bones and no hip fractures. Because just the other day a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed mortality, i.e. death risk, after a hip fracture lasts for at least 10 years.

So, if broken hips, brittle bones and drug side effects aren’t your thing, give Osteoporosis Protection for Life a try. In it, Dr. Fuhrman also talks about how much calcium people need and the importance of getting vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, what foods are loaded with calcium, such as Bok-choy and spinach, and for you fitness nuts, like me, Dr. Fuhrman demonstrates some funky exercises, like squat jumps, lunge walks and superman swim. It’s a bird, it’s a plane!

Okay, not to be all salesy, but if you’re a man or woman, or just a smart-alecky twenty-something like me, Osteoporosis Protection for Life could be a launching pad on your way to strong, healthy bones. No one wants to be a hunchback when they’re older—right?

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Cutting Salt Helps Blood Vessels Relax

A new study in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests the benefits of reducing salt may extend beyond heart health. Australian researchers examined 29 overweight and obese men and women with normal blood pressure. Participants were randomly assigned a low-salt diet or an American diet for 2 weeks. After 2 weeks, they switched to the other diet, followed by 2 weeks of no intervention. Findings revealed people on a low-salt diet had lower systolic blood pressure and improved flow-mediated dilation (FMD), which is blood vessels ability to relax; FoodNavigator investigates.

Salt is not part of a healthy diet. According to Dr. Fuhrman, salt increases the body’s excretion of calcium, leading to bone loss and osteoporosis. And salt is very dangerous for vegans and vegetarians. It boosts risk boosts their risk of hemorrhagic stroke risk.

But a different kind of salt was recently named healthy! Salt Lake City, Utah is the fittest city in the United States. Sorry, shameless tie-in!

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