Low Vitamin D Linked to Infection During Pregnancy

According to new research in The Journal of Nutrition, experts claim low blood levels of vitamin D increase risk of a harmful bacteria infection called vaginosis. For the study, scientists tested 469 women in their first trimester of pregnancy and found 41% of women had vaginosis and 52% had low levels of vitamin D. The women with vaginosis had lower levels of vitamin D than those without the infection; Reuters explains.

Recently, low levels of vitamin D were tied to multiple sclerosis and higher risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. So make sure you get enough vitamin D! Vitamin D reduces risk of prostate cancer and helps build strong bones, which protects against osteoporosis.

If you need help keeping your vitamin D up, Dr. Fuhrman’s Osteo-Sun is specially formulated to provide sufficient vitamin D, both in its vegan and non-vegan forms.

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Exercise Helps Prevent Breast Cancer

Presented at the American College of Sports Medicine's annual meeting researchers say women older than 30 who exercise more than 1 hour a week may have a lower risk of breast cancer. Scientists asked over 4,000 women to recall their physical activity levels when they were 10 to 15 years old, ages 30 to 50 and ages 50 and up. Women exercising in the over 30 group significantly reduced their chances of getting breast cancer; Reuters reports.

Exercise is great, but in January a report showed women under 70 are less active than men. Not good ladies, especially since regular physical activity helps strengthen bones and prevent osteoporosis and exercise like Tai Chi fights arthritis and diabetes.

In related news, America’s unhealthy habit of driving everywhere, even to the corner store, means we’re walking less, contributing to obesity and illness, like heart disease.

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Low Vitamin D May Harm Knees

More kudos for vitamin D! A new study in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism claims insufficient vitamin D may cause cartilage loss in knee joints. For the study, involving 880 men and women, ages 51 to 79, scientists measured blood levels of vitamin D and knee cartilage volume. And 3 years later, retesting of 353 people revealed 58% had changes in knee cartilage and worsening osteoarthritis, both men and women with low vitamin D had less knee cartilage; Reuters reports.

Vitamin D is strong medicine and we get vitamin D from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. Vitamin D functions as a hormone, telling our intestines to absorb calcium and phosphorus, which builds strong bones and prevents things like rickets, depression and even difficulty thinking!

In his DVD Osteoporosis Protection for Life, Dr. Fuhrman explains why vitamin D is so critical, the importance of proper diet and he demonstrates a number of bone strengthening exercises.

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